#34697
Hey guys, I've searched the forums here and couldn't find what I needed. As my post question states I'm wondering if any of you have had reasonable success cutting out a motherboard with a hand saw. I would just get a jig saw but I don't have a good work area, or need for a jig saw at this time. Any help is much appreciated. If you have done this before what wood do you recommend and what type of hand saw would work best for cutting curves?
#34698
Prolly need a jigsaw, a hand saw, or skillsaw, im guessing is what u mean , wont cut curves well....at all. my first pack was made mostly out of plywood, using 1/2" for the motherboard.

but you might be able to if thats all you have, will just be a pain in the ass
#34700
I've used a Coping saw to reasonable success. If you cut as close to the outline as possible with a normal saw then take out little bits at a time with a coping saw you can't go wrong. I assume they're called Coping saws everywhere but that's what they're called in the UK.
#34705
Even if you can buy a really cheap jigsaw (around $20) it'll be well worth it for cutting out your motherboard with ease even if you just use it the one time.

On my very first pack I used a jigsaw to cut my mobo out of wood. It took a lot of Bondo to cover up the wood grain afterwards though (I used plywood).

Beware that if you do use MDF (which cuts and sands really well) you can't screw into it (they could tear out); you'll have to bolt onto it.

-Eric
#34706
thanks Funk, that's really helpful man. My last pack my dad helped me out so I got lucky and got to use his tools. I want to build one for him as a surprise as he expressed great interest in being a Ghostbuster for one of his halloween parties next year. I want to go with him so here we go again :) This'll be pack number 3 that I've built.
At least I have all year.
#34714
Thanks again for the info about the coping saw JT94. My only other bet with a hand saw it seems would be a keyhole saw (aka drywall saw). I have one of these already but I think I'm going to break down and get a jig saw as I can find one for $20-$30. I plan to put a pack together in the next few months. I'll post progress once I get it going.
#34719
but I think I'm going to break down and get a jig saw as I can find one for $20-$30.


http://search.ebay.com/search/search.dl ... category0=

Or

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/d ... mber=92772

And yes you sure can cut it out by hand, the right saw and having the skills is all that is needed... Fine woodworking was started long before the advent of power tools... And you will find most cabinet makers and fine wood workers still use hand saws on a regular basis as you have more control in many cases... But yes electric tools make the job easier and faster in many cases...
#34720
Thanks for the insightful info Exoray. That's why I love these boards. There's always a lot of new info to learn from everyone's different methods. Maybe I'll challenge myself to make a proton pack the old fashioned way with hand tools. It would be a fun project, and very rewarding. I cut a lot of the wood pieces for my second pack by hand in my dad's shop and it's really not that bad.
#4942426
lucas2600b wrote: November 19th, 2007, 11:45 am Hey guys, I've searched the forums here and couldn't find what I needed. As my post question states I'm wondering if any of you have had reasonable success cutting out a motherboard with a hand saw. I would just get a jig saw but I don't have a good work area, or need for a jig saw at this time. Any help is much appreciated. If you have done this before what wood do you recommend and what type of hand saw would work best for cutting curves? By the way MDF I usually buy here https://sheetmaterialswholesale.co.uk/
Yes? cutting MDF is posible, but really hard. Good luck!
#4942505
Hey, RonnyT07, formally "Slimer7/S-7" on here. If you browse through some of my old photos, past packs were built using 1/4" plywood motherboards. With a good jigsaw and some solid blades, you can get some really nice cuts. Just make sure you have a level surface, wood is clearly marked, plenty of room for tolerances, pre sanded wood, and room to file down the rough edges. Also factor that there may be some chipping when you cut the wood especially if your going against the grain. That's where I've had the most problems.
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